Getting Your Hands Dirty

Getting Your Hands Dirty

Three Historic Cities Celebrated for Hands-on Culinary Adventures

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to play chef for a day? I’m not talking about that meal kit that appears on your doorstep and contains exactly the right amount of saffron you need to make a gorgeously golden risotto. To really step into a chef’s shoes—or, Crocs™, in their case—you need an interactive, firsthand tutorial where you’re taught why there’s so much more to cooking than meets the plate.

Close the cookbooks, turn off the YouTube videos, and let a gourmet expert take you on a delicious adventure. No need to scan the internet to figure out where these one-of-a-kind culinary experiences exist. We’ve mapped out some of the Southeast’s most popular cooking classes set in historic cities. Each of these towns are brimming with fascinating background stories; not to mention an abundant number of restaurants where you can sip and sample the roots of the land. With a superior dining scene comes a magnitude of brilliant chefs, and many long to share their love for the kitchen by teaching you how to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty.

The best part? You get to eat the homework.

Savannah, Georgia
If you’re buzzing around Savannah’s historic landmark district and looking for a lively way to take in the city’s epicurean culture—700 Kitchen Cooking School has got to be on your list. They provide both individuals and groups with exclusive personalized opportunities to engage in gastronomic escapades. In case that wasn’t enough of a luxury, the school—and its state-of-the-art kitchen—is located inside of Mansion on Forsyth Park. This former funeral home turned whimsical hotel is praised for its architecture alone (a red-brick and terra-cotta 19th century structure that mimics Savannah’s classic Southern Gothic style).

Museum of Forsyth ParkThe only problem at 700 Kitchen is narrowing down which course you’ll take on, as the colorful variety reflects a range of culinary delights. If you adore the vibrant sights, aromas, and flavors of local produce—the Farmer’s Market Tour has your name all over it. You’ll master how to select the freshest goodies from the Forsyth Park Farmer’s Market and then prepare a farm-to-table meal (mimosa in-hand) with your ingredients. If you’re looking to learn more about meat-free cooking, take the Plant Based Cuisine class for a spin. You’ll dive into the world of plant-based delights and bright flavors that make vegan dishes (like butternut squash and sweet potato silk soup) light and satisfying.

To get to the heart of authentic Savannah storytelling served with a side of comfort food, the Low Country Staples session is a fan favorite. Ever wondered how Southern chefs produce cheese grits so velvety you could nap inside of them? This is your chance. No matter what course you land on or whether you’re learning with a crowd or flying solo—the opportunity to explore the minds of the school’s culinary team (like Michelin Star Executive Chef Shahin Afsharian) is a treat in itself.

700 Kitchen Cooking SchoolTo discover what it means to “Cook Between the Lines,” Chef Darin’s Kitchen Table is another interactive, educational experience where the chopping is up to you. Chef Darin’s approach is all about immersing his students in preparation, teaching them how to demystify advanced techniques, and advising them on understanding common ingredients. He’s no stranger to teaching his way through Savannah’s food landscape—as his former position was 700 Kitchen’s Cooking School Director. He developed the programs that led to the establishment being named one of the city’s “Top Things to Do” on Tripadvisor.

A strong advocate of team-building, Chef Darin even provides private classes to corporate businesses to help them develop rapport and improve the work environment. But if you’re just looking to enjoy a social activity centered around food—he’s got plenty of lesson plans that encourage creativity and ease in the kitchen.

Wilmington, North Carolina
This town is a small enough town where most natives, particularly the food enthusiasts, know the top chefs on a first-name basis. When ranking the most exceptional eateries in Wilmington, you can always count on Pinpoint to make the cut. Run by Southern kitchen wizard Dean Neff, this Lowcountry restaurant opened in downtown several years back and immediately climbed its way to the top. Luckily, there are now more ways than simply dining at Pinpoint to connect with Neff’s gastronomic genius—as he hopped on board to instruct at Wilmington’s premiere cooking school—Seasoned Gourmet.

Pinpoint run by Southern kitchen wizard Dean Neff

Get the hang of oyster shucking and rub elbows with a charming chef whose catfish and grits were featured on Cooking Channel? Yes, please.

You’ve strolled the Riverwalk, hit Front Street Brewery for an icy pint, and taken Wilmington’s famed walking tour of downtown’s historic district. What’s next? All signs point to Seasoned Gourmet. This staple has been offering cooking classes for over 20 years and is the proud home of the Cape Fear Food & Wine Club. Whether you’re a local looking to change up your typical date night or a visitor in town exploring the area, Seasoned Gourmet will indulge your every desire to nerd out in the kitchen. From learning classic techniques alongside Wilmington’s most proficient experts on regional cuisine to getting to know the world of wine pairing, there’s something to scratch every curious culinary itch.

wilmington nc seasoned gourmet desserts

Other worthy Wilmington chefs (like Keith Rhodes of Catch and Sam Cahoon of Savorez, to name a few) have raised their hands to guide folks through fun, interactive demos showcasing their signature cuisine. Rhodes gives insider tips on Asian specialties infused with a Southern twang, and Cahoon presents a bold perspective into spicy, fresh Latin American ceviche. All instructors share a similar mission of making chef-oriented food accessible so that students receive a genuine, thoughtful experience. Whether your goal is group bonding, weekend mingling, or basic education—Seasoned Gourmet is a one-stop-kitchen-shop where you’re always guaranteed to leave full and happy.

Charleston, South Carolina
Noted for encompassing one of the nation’s most energetic restaurant scenes, it’s no surprise that Charleston boasts numerous locations where you can pick up some slicing and dicing skills of your own. Chef Bob Waggoner’s In The Kitchen series was voted as one of South Carolina’s 10 best cooking classes, and it’s the perfect place to get schooled in seasonal tastings inspired by local farmers, fishermen, and artisans.

Zero GeorgeFood Fire + Knives (FFK) is another culinary Carolina mecca recognized for breaking down the process of creating a customized menu to fit your needs. They also offer an exclusive package where you don’t even have to leave the house. Picture this for your next party: a chef arrives at your door with ingredients, equipment, cleaning supplies, and aprons. It doesn’t get much easier than that. If your space isn’t ideal, FFK also has kitchen rental options. The hands-on workshops highlight everything from the fundamentals (where you’ll grasp universal cooking techniques and master the chef’s knife) to trickier fare like Thai food.

South Carolinians rave over the European-style boutique hotel Zero George for its eclectic vibe and lush courtyard locale—but it’s equally as sought-after for its ability to help aspiring chefs and cooks hone their skills. At Zero George, guests get a front row seat in the professional display kitchen watching master chefs (like Kristen Kish—Top Chef Winner) stage exquisite plates of food. Zero George’s cooking school isn’t hands-on, but rather focuses on teaching apprentices to “get tutored in good taste.” They also get to dine on the very creation that they saw come together from start to finish (not to mention walk away with an enhanced culinary repertoire).cooking classes with zero george

Earlier this year, Callie White (namesake of Charleston’s legendary Callie’s Hot Little Biscuits) trained students in approachable methods of Moroccan cuisine. What says good taste more than learning about Moroccan fare from one of Charleston’s best-known biscuiteers? Hosted in their 1804 kitchen carriage house and taught around the signature Heston range, these two-hour intimate classes are an unforgettable way to chomp into Charleston.

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The Wilmington Food Scene

The Wilmington Food Scene

Wilmington is the foodie capital of the NC coast.

 

Eat Your Heart Out, Wilmington, NC

Your 3-day weekend guide to gobbling your way through the Port City

Fruity drinks on the water and enough crab cakes to build a fort. Foodies pair well with this coastal town. 

Thanks to a Wilmington, NC, zip code, this may be my daily reality—but it’s not real life for everyone. I get that. Living in a vacation town definitely comes with its perks, and one of them is the multitude of visitors we receive looking to live it up Wilmington-style for the weekend. Opening our homes to our tourist and traveler friends of all ages comes with a responsibility, though. Being a coastal native means that it’s your job to show these folks a good time—especially when it comes to food. But, with every versatile group having different dining destinations in mind, how do you map out your Friday, Saturday, and Sunday itineraries to please your friends?

This is where I come in (No, seriously, can I come?). With Wilmington offering so many restaurant styles that speak to the masses, I decided to split things up and lay out three (three-day) eating excursions. Whether you live riverside and happen to be hosting guests or are a tourist yourself in town for a long weekend—pay attention. I’m about to show you how to seamlessly cruise your way through the Port City’s cuisine.

The Wilmington Food Scene Caters to Crustacean Cravings

Friday

Let’s start with the obvious. Wilmington is a water town, after all, so the hunt for seafood is strong with this crowd. The biggest problem is knowing how to avoid the tourist traps and finding the hot spots locals actually frequent. Shellfish for breakfast? Oh yes, we do. This coastal community loves its crab cakes so much; we even bring them to the breakfast table.

1 Eternal Sunshine on Eastwood Road has benedicts for days, and if you’re feeling something fishy on a Friday, this is your jam. Get a load of hand-pattied blue crab claw meat a la croissant or sample the Smoked Salmon Benedict on parmesan peppercorn bread.

2  Going light for lunch? Look no further than NOFO’s Savorez. Also look at their Yelp status because it’s impressively impeccable. The Brooklyn Arts District has been blowing up in the past few years, and Sam Cahoon’s luxurious Latin fare has only made the homey neighborhood that much more of a draw. Pop in just before noon, snag a seat at the bar, and start with a Black Cadillac featuring Hornitos Plata tequila, agave, fresh pineapple and lime juice, and a Grand Marnier Floater. In the non-liquid lunch department, everyone in your party will be fighting over who gets to lick the plate of the Langousta Y Coco (lobster ceviche in an inexplicably addictive citrus-coconut ginger marinade spiked with habanero).Savorez Cuisine is one of every Wilmington Foodie's Favorite.

It’s been a filling day. Scratch heavy dinner plans, and catch the sunset at  3 Anne Bonny’s on the Riverwalk where baller buffalo and blue cheese shrimp meet frozen rose, and live music is always on deck.

Saturday

Wakey, wakey. We’re headed to the shore. Start your Saturday off at   4 King Neptune on Wrightsville Beach’s main strip. This Lumina Avenue longtime gem runs from sunrise to late night and offers coastal southern cuisine that will cure you from the night before. Set your sights on the Crab Bowl—a delicate mixture of egg whites, citrusy pico de gallo, guacamole, and crab meat. King Neptune’s take on shrimp and grits also gets high marks from regulars.
Thanks to a lighter morning meal, lead your mounting appetite to 5 Cape Fear Seafood Company (with three locations, I might add) for a lowcountry lunch. Get your spread on by sharing the bubbly Crab Dip—a rich hybrid of crab, spicy horseradish, cheese, and spices served with dippable pita points. If a downhome southern dish is what you’re after, the seafood platters—which come broiled, grilled, or fried—are a comforting bite of the coast.
Finish your Saturday seafood finale by following       6 Joe Loves Lobster Rolls food truck wherever it rolls for a seriously succulent, seriously loaded handheld with lobster meat straight from Maine.

 

Grand Highlands Banner

 

Sunday

Take it easy (like a Sunday morning) and treat yourself to some extra sleep. Roll into 7 Shuckin’ Shack around 11 AM, and belly up to their epic Bloody Mary bar where you check off your choice of spirit, mix, rim, and garnish—and they take care of the rest. This recently unveiled masterpiece is brimming with booze and cream-cheese stuffed snacks. Cover breakfast and lunch here by pairing your tomatoey concoction with a pile of chargrilled oysters.

For a superior Sunday night seafood feast, hit up…

8  Catch on the busy end of Market close to Gordon Road. Global twists on regional seafood is the sweet spot of this Asian-southern fusion restaurant, and celeb chef and James Beard nominee Keith Rhodes is always on his game. Go for the soft shells if the season is right; otherwise get after the signature North Carolina Lump Crab Cakes in Lobster Cream and 1/2 Pound “Hong Kong” Tempura Lobster Tail with a citrusy ponzu reduction.

Brews & Chews

Friday

Gastropubs have become a Wilmington specialty, and there’s no shortage of these beer havens doling out topnotch homemade bar food. The majority of our area’s well-known breweries (Wilmington Brewing Company, Flytrap, New Anthem, and Waterline to name a few) specialize in superb hops, but only carry food in the form of food trucks out front. For those brewpubs that are kicking it in the kitchen, here are some of your stops.

Front Street Brewery is a Downtown gastropub fave.9   Bill’s Front Porch is kind enough to include Friday in their morning menu lineup, and regulars rave over the brewpub’s Sunday-Fil-A (an open-faced fried chicken biscuit sammy with pimento cheese, a fried egg, and sriracha). The Breakfast Stout has your name all over it.

Once mid-day hits, a sandy-toed walk by the ocean (in any weather) is always a treat. When you’ve crossed exercise off your list, treat yo’self to a flight of suds and a fiercely good bowl of greens at Wrightsville Beach’s…

10  Waterman’s Brewing. Head Chef Andrew Stanley is an artist when it comes to vibrant presentations and the Berry Salad with goat cheese, candied walnuts, and berry-beer vinaigrette is a healthy mouthful. The Po’ Boys—boasting flawlessly fried seafood, tart pickle, and tangy remoulade—are a meal made for two. Pair one with the Abundant Sunshine IPA with lingering piney resin and notes of mango, grapefruit, lemon, and coconut.

Stick around WB and hit the bustling patio of…

11  Poe’s Tavern for dinner. Though they’re not brewing in-house, the craft lineup is impressive at this lively eatery. Chomp down on Edgar’s Nachos: mounds of multicolored tortilla chips layered with a generous amount of creamy jack cheese, hoppy booze-infused chili, pico, guac, and spicy jalapenos. The tavern also prides itself on making a mean burger, and the brilliantly cooked, smothered beef (and veggie) sammies exceed every expectation. Taco-wise, the Buffalo Shrimp with Marinated Bacon-Blue Cheese Cole Slaw hits the spot.

Saturday

With a brunch menu served Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., you can’t pass up…

12  Fork n Cork to fire up the day. This quaint, artisanal burger and beer bar has always been locally famed for its enormously satisfying creations, but received a national nod when Guy Fieri and his Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives crew popped in for chef/ owner James Smith’s confit duck wings and beef wellington bites. If you’re in the mood for a hearty breakfast, the Brisket Biscuit (14-hour smoked brisket, two sunny side up eggs, and a creole mustard cream sauce) is your one-way ticket to food coma land.The Fork & Cork is fine dining disguised.

13 Skytown Beer + BBQ on New Centre Drive is tapping righteous housemade brews and dishing out smoky specialties. Taste familiar? Their sister restaurant is popular Princess Street taco joint.

14  Beer Barrio. Still full from Fork? Share the deep-fried sausage gravy bites (Yeah, you read that right!) and a round of Dreamsicle Milkshake IPAs.

Wilmington’s food truck scene is rapidly expanding, so you’ll want to hit as many as you can in a short amount of time. Look for 15 CheeseSmith Co. at whatever brewery or bottle shop parking lot this grilled cheese mobile has pulled into Saturday night. Their eclectic lineup—like the Buffalo Baby with creamy Havarti, braised buffalo chicken, buttermilk ranch, and quick pickled carrot and celery slaw—is nothing short of divine.

Sunday

Yesterday was a pants popper. Skip breakfast and swing into downtown staple 16 Front Street Brewery (the first of its kind around here) for lunch. Known for epic pulled barbeque chicken nachos and a double happy hour, any time of day is a good time at FSB.

Nothing says late Sunday afternoon like pizza, and 17  Wrightsville Beach Brewing Company is a beach go-to where the crackly pie crusts are made with beer-infused dough and the draft list boasts crushable crafts. Ask owner Jud Watkins for a flight of his favorites or tap into the classics like the seasonable Puppy Drum Pale or the Orange Krush Kölsch permeated with fragrant orange peel and hints of vanilla. Get your veg on with the flash fried Tempura Cauliflower tossed in your choice of sauce, or pop a few of the Kimchi & Fried Oyster Bites whose acidic punch of vinegar and chili cut the fat from the fryer.

Flip Flops & Bowties

Friday

While Wilmington certainly offers its fair share of fine dining establishments, we’re a comfortable coastal town where board shorts are almost always acceptable. That being said, enjoying a fancy meal or craft cocktail in your flip flops around here is the norm. Hey, you made it to Friday! You deserve something frothy. Pop into 18 Bespoke Coffee & Dry Goods on Princess Street where the chic Counter Culture Coffee baristas doodle hearts in the dirty chai lattes. Locally baked goods are great for grab-and-go.

Since the portions at…

19 Indochine are typically large enough to ensure leftovers, split an early lunch here so you don’t fill up before dinner. Favorites from this oriental far East café include classic sweet-and-sour Pad Thai and light Vietnamese Pork Meatballs loaded with citrusy lemongrass.

There’s no better prescription for satisfying your hunger than a Southern, locally-inspired feast at 5th and Castle Street’s  20 RX Restaurant. Known for being one of the first eateries to bring genuine farm-to-table dining to the Wilmington food scene, RX stole our hearts years ago and still steadily wows regulars with their seasonally-changing menu. Many items are pork-tastic (like the wonderfully quirky Buffalo Pig Ears with funky Bleu cheese), but RX is equally praised for their cocktails and thoughtfully-prepared seafood.

Saturday

Superstar chef Jessica Cabo (a season 1 competitor on Hell’s Kitchen) runs  21 East Oceanfront Dining inside Wrightsville Beach’s Blockade Runner. Her globally-influenced seafood and vegetarian dishes are explosive, and her a la carte breakfast menu is just as refined. I vote for the Exotic Mushroom Omelet with peppery arugula and goat cheese. This upscale, yet relaxing restaurant is famed for their gorgeous canopied garden deck which overlooks the beach. Stick around for lunch.

Am I biased about…  

Pin Point - Best meal Fanny Slater has ever had. 22 PinPoint Restaurant? Yup, and I have no problem admitting it. I consistently pick Pinpoint as the top eatery in Wilmington thanks to head chef and co-owner Dean Neff’s ability to work magic with anything edible. Their menu is slammed with local seasonal offerings from Wilmington’s farmers, fishermen, oystermen, and crabbers. Raw oysters here are an absolute must and come with spicy chilled cocktail sauce, yuzu-cucumber granita (spa water meets crushed ice), and a tangy shallot-based mignonette. For dinner, the Crisp Smoked North Carolina Catfish crusted in cornmeal and bathed in lemon brown butter is the best thing I ever ate. Don’t believe me? Google “PinPoint + Best Thing I Ever Ate.”

Sunday

Okay, I know I just went googly eyed for PinPoint—but here’s my P.S. I love you too…

23 Love, Lydia Bakery & Café. This charming coffee shop (owned by Lydia Clopton—PinPoint’s head pastry chef—not to mention, Dean’s wife) recently opened on South 3rd Street to rave reviews. The building is a lovely re-furbished house, and you’ll want to cozy up with a cappuccino, a book, and one of Lydia’s crispy bacon, egg soufflé, and smoked gouda biscuit sandwiches and never leave.

I made you carb-load for breakfast (and will again for dinner), so I’m sending you straight to…

24 Steam Restaurant & Bar—one of downtown’s newest eateries tucked inside The Embassy Suites. The hotel’s classy coastal demeanor and style parallels the restaurant’s vibe, and though you can get smothered Southern things like creamed leek and béarnaise fried oysters, I’ve sent you here for the salads and waterfront view. I’m a sucker for the Riverside Caesar: bright chilled hearts of romaine, shaved parmesan, white anchovies, and a luxuriously creamy garlic dressing.

Get out your stretchy pants; we’re off to…

25 Tarantelli’s where familiar Tuscan fare sprinkled with live arias and a splash of Montepulciano is the epitome of Italian spirit. Beautifully crafted dishes like the Sicilian Braciole—thin rolled and stuffed beef tenderloin with loads of garlic, pine nuts, parmesan cheese, and prosciutto—tastes like home to those who grew up with traditional Italian cooking. It’s rare to dine at Tarantelli’s without spotting a group wow-ing over the Spaghetti al Formaggio Parmigiana prepared tableside in an enormous oversized wheel of Parmesan cheese (doused in whiskey and lit on fire). What better way to end the weekend?

Wilmington Area Communities

When you are checking out the Wilmington cuisine, you’ll also want to see the welcoming communities and experienced builders who will work with you to design your dream home on the North Carolina coast.

1    Bill Clark Homes is a family business that has been building top-quality residences in Wilmington and all over the Carolinas for more than 40 years. Among their newest neighborhoods are The Landing at Mill Creek, located just three miles from North Topsail Beach, and Channel Watch, an intimate community of 36 homes off River Road in Wilmington. BillClarkHomes.com

2   The Bluffs on the Cape Fear offers large riverfront home sites and move-in-ready homes. Amenities include a private Beach Club on Oak Island and a resort-style clubhouse with a pool. The two-acre Riverfront Park & Boat Launch opens soon, to be followed by a new fitness center with pickleball courts. TheBluffsNC.com

3   Brunswick Forest has residential offerings that range from low-maintenance patio homes to estate-size home sites. The Villages commercial hub now includes the New Hanover Regional Medical Center. Recreational amenities like the Cape Fear National golf course, a complete fitness center, and kayak/canoe launches keep active residents happy and healthy. BrunswickForest.com

4   Cambridge Village of Wilmington makes independent retirement living a reality with spacious one- and two-bedroom apartment homes. The Optimal Living Center has a wellness director to customize every resident’s fitness plan, a life enrichment director to plan social events, and pampering professional services at the Salon & MedSpa.

5   Compass Pointe offers resort-style living in an award-winning master-planned community. The golf club is home to one of the best new courses in the Carolinas, while other fitness amenities include a wellness center, tennis/pickleball courts, and miles of hiking/biking paths. The Grand Lanai Amenities Center hosts community events.

6   Landfall is a family-oriented residential community with playgrounds, playing fields, and walking trails in 320 acres of conservation land. In addition to the Cliff Drysdale Sports Complex, The Country Club of Landfall is a member-owned golf club with two challenging championship courses by Jack Nicklaus and Pete Dye.

7   Logan Homes is the leading name in coastal living with unique residential designs in premier Carolina locations like Wilmington. Their signature Build Smart program includes personal service at state-of-the-art design studios, the latest energy-efficient features in every home, and a complete warranty program for lasting peace of mind. LoganHomes.com

8   Palmetto Creek, perfectly situated between Wilmington and Myrtle Beach near Southport,features a beautiful boardwalk trail through a natural Palmetto preserve. One of the community’s preferred builders is Horizon Homes, a family-run business that provides quality homes at affordable prices. PalmettoCreek.com

9   River Bluffs features single-family homes and choice home sites along the North Cape Fear River. Lifestyle amenities include Davis Square events, boat/kayak launches, walking trails, a fitness center, tennis/pickleball courts, and an elevated riverwalk. Lunches at Porches Cafe can include produce from the 10-acre community farm. RiverBluffLiving.com

10  River Lights is a residential destination for young professionals to active retirees with traditional single-family, maintenance-free town homes, and age 55+ neighborhoods. The Marina Village is a hub of shopping and dining, while the wellness-centered lifestyle is enhanced by seven miles of trails, four community parks and a 38-acre recreational lake. RiverLightsLiving.com   

11  St. James Plantation offers single-family residences and low-maintenance town homes in an unspoiled coastal setting. Golf memberships feature access to four championship courses and clubhouses. Also on-site are four fitness centers, an Intracoastal Waterway marina, and 36+ miles of walking trails. The private Beach Club on Oak Island and the seaside town of Southport are just minutes away. SJPLife.com/Living

12  Summerhouse on Everett Bay is a private residential community near the popular oceanfront destinations of Surf City and Topsail Island. Move-in-ready homes and customizable floor plans from leading builders are available. Community amenities include a clubhouse with pool, fitness center with tennis courts, and boat/kayak launches with direct Intracoastal Waterway access.

 

 

Poolside Burgers, Exotic Herbs, & Whole Hog BBQ:  Chef Robert Daugherty livens up The Peninsula Country Club

Poolside Burgers, Exotic Herbs, & Whole Hog BBQ: Chef Robert Daugherty livens up The Peninsula Country Club

Chef Daugherty is the Peninsula Country Club's head chef.Last year we took a peek into the daily lives of the executive chefs pulling the strings in the kitchens of some of the coast’s most celebrated country clubs. I chatted with Chef Robert L. Daugherty—at the time, a newcomer to the country club world after retiring from the hotel business—who expressed his excitement and anticipation for relocating to the heartland of America. A chef with a strong draw toward the Portuguese-influenced ingredients of his New England roots (not to mention the righteous lobsters and clams), Robert was ready to take on the warm climate, beach weather, and all the edible bounty Millsboro, DE, had to offer. His first full season watching the fields grow was 2017, so I decided to check in and see how he’s grown into his role at The Peninsula Golf & Country Club in Millsboro, DE. From the innovative American regional cuisine he serves daily at the club to his poolside Cabana Bar dishing out oysters and garden fresh mint mojitos to smoking a whole pig in La Caja China (an enormous roasting box that results in crispy skin), there’s nothing this imaginative chef won’t do to keep his guests happy.

How has your culinary skillset grown over the last year?

We’re growing all of our own herbs—exotic varieties like pineapple sage and opal basil—and doing containers around the club house. We’re running out quickly and harvesting them every day on the porch and patio. We also have a huge bin of mint that we’re using in cocktails like mojitos, as well as for desserts. We’re really having fun trying to involve our team in the dining room with members.

Did this past year bring about any new food trends that you’ve incorporated into your style?

I’m still very passionate about New England cuisine and, of course, fish. I’m a fanatic about fish and that’s continued to evolve. I sent my executive sous chef up to Foley Fish School (the oldest fish house in Boston). She did a three-and-a-half-day intensive training on the fishing boats, went to the fish auctions, and got to see what really fresh fish is. I also found a way to bring a truck down here once a week, so on Thursdays we get a truck full of oysters and fish from Georges Bank where the Labrador current meets the gulf. The water current is so rough, the fish actually have the most developed muscle structure. The halibut, cod, and scallops that come from there are amazing.

Chef Robert Daugherty getting fancy at the Peninsula Country Club. Over the warmer months, what did your kitchen team do to keep things interesting?

The pool area is new for our chefs. We didn’t pay much attention to it last year, but this year we built an outdoor lower cooking area. This “Cabana Bar” is part of our raw bar and poolside burger bar which we do on Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. We’re bringing in Wellfleet oysters and local ones from Moonstone Bay and Rhode Island. We share them with members (along with specialties like my New England clam chowder). We also do Angus burgers right off the grill and when people smell that charcoal, they start to crave it. We do portobellos and chicken on the grill, but the burgers are the hit. We served over 220 burgers around July 4th.

Speaking of July 4th, what other special events did your team put on for the members this past year?

For July 4th, the club was filled with extended family and friends and we had everything from bouncy houses to live music to the poolside burger bar. Everybody enjoyed themselves! Another special event is the sunset celebration we do every Thursday. We do a special raw bar by the Cabana Bar and folks get to enjoy the sunset on the horizon with a complimentary champagne toast. It’s our salute to the sunset and we also have a yachting cannon we fire off. This sunset celebration has grown to about 80 to 90 people.

People also still love our Wednesday night Iron Chef Battles where two of our chefs go head-to-head with one ingredient and everyone in the dining rooms gets to taste the dishes. Recently, one chef made salmon cakes over quinoa salad with a roasted red pepper coulis, and the other did a 28-hour brined and marinated roasted chicken with a cider vinegar reduction. It’s our way of developing the younger culinary talent, and it’s proven to be a busy night.

Are you still preparing wine and beer dinners, and how do you put your own spin on them?

We have a fantastic wine room (pictured in the photo) and we just finished an event for homeowners there. The room seats 34 people and it’s where we do our Chef’s Table events among other special celebrations. We recently hosted one themed as “foods from Greece” and the menu was filled with items like grilled octopus, a “Mezze Table” with stuffed grape leaves, falafel, spanakopita, etc. We have a lot of fun beer dinners, and we’re gearing up to do one with Heady Seas Brewing soon. They’re bringing their beer master in and instead of just one meal, we’re having an entire festival with tastings. It will be an outdoor event and we’ll definitely roast a whole pig there too and get a pirate to fire the cannon!

We also feature great themed wine dinners. We have 190 members who are part of a wine club and there is an event every month for them. Last month, our executive chef helped put together the “Rosé by the Pool” menu that was three courses all paired with rosé. This month is BBQ and wine by the pool.

I know you’re focused on healthier cooking techniques for members who are more conscious of their nutrition. I’m sure that’s easier to do in the summer. How do you incorporate that into the winter months when folks want hearty comfort food but still want to maintain an overall healthy lifestyle?

I have to get very creative. We have a strong following of a low carb club who dines with us every two months. It’s about 30 to 35 people and they challenge our staff to come up with a carb-free menu. The last challenge was an Italian dinner, and we prepared items like Carpaccio, roasted vegetables, aiolis, and different appetizers. We actually made risotto out of cauliflower rice and did a brunoise (fine dice) of root vegetables—similar to how you would prepare risotto with whine wine, cheese, and onions. It was a hit. We also made zucchini noodles and squash and carrot bundles that resembled pasta. There was veal braised with prosciutto, sage, and mozzarella in a pan sauce. They thought they were in Italy! Our next one is a luau and we’ll be preparing Kalua pig and a number of different things from Hawaii. I have a great chef from Spain who worked for seven years on The Big Island. For this event, we just bought a La Caja China box and plan to go whole hog.
What aromatics do you suggest folks to use at home to incorporate flavors, sauces, etc.?

I’m a big fan of toasted seeds like cardamom and coriander and I love to crush them to make rubs and marinades. I also enjoy using fruitier oils (like grapeseed) that bring out the flavors in proteins. For lighter proteins like fish, I go light and mild with ingredients like dill, lemon zest, or other types of citrus rubs. For meats or heavier items, I like robust herbs and flavors like rosemary, thyme, and garlic.

When we spoke a year ago, you mentioned this was your first country club experience and was all new to you. What have been your biggest learning curves that have helped you to grow in this position?

Chef Daugherty and his staff in the Peninsula Country Club kitchen.

It’s all about continuing to learn what our members want and what style of cuisine they’re enjoying. I want to feel like I’m taking them on my path of my experience with cooking. I want to introduce them to things from my past and my history of food. Learning our membership and getting them to trust us and have confidence in us and our events is important to me. It’s certainly blossomed because many of our events now sell out regularly!

The personal preferences of members is also very important to us. There are quite a number of people who are gluten-free and conscious of what they’re eating so for us—yes is always the answer. If they want something off of the menu, we never say no. That’s our attitude. Our biggest learning curve right now is managing reservations and the dining room. We need to make sure we’re maximizing our numbers, but also making sure that the flow into the kitchen is executed properly. It’s all about restaurant 101 and making sure the dining room floor is managed effectively. If you’re doing 220 to 230 covers on a weekend night, you gotta be on point!

How do you get feedback from your members on what’s working for them and what they’d like to see improve?

We have a notes section called 4 Ts (which is the Open Table of the club house world) and customers can comment on what they like or want. We’re doing an in-house baking program now because we’ve had so many requests for celebration cakes. Folks also put down their dietary needs and table requests, so all of this helps us customize members’ experiences in the dining room.
You were in a New England setting for three decades and used to lobsters, clams, and a Portuguese influence on the food. Last year was your first full season watching the fields grow. What regional ingredients have you really grown to love?

Crab season is coming around so I’m definitely enjoying working with the local crabs. I also have a guy working with us whose dad has a farm, and this year we’re buying his tomatoes and corn. We’ve developed this menu item called “3-hour Corn” where the idea is that the corn is picked and on your table in just three hours. Its will be in the form of a fresh corn salad, street corn, etc. The tomatoes are also coming in and they’re just simple, beautiful, vine-ripened tomatoes that are sweet and deep red in color. Nothing compares to them!

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Bites and Sips to Make You Flip Your Lids

Bites and Sips to Make You Flip Your Lids

Slam Dunk Summer Cocktails and Concoctions

It’s that glorious time of year where salty breezes, tank tops, and open-toed shoes signify one thing: “before it’s 5 o’clock somewhere” season is upon us. The temperatures are rising and the golden sun is shining so treat yourself to good eats and drinks and—as my boy Kenny Chesney says—let the warm air melt those blues away. Here are some summer cocktails and savory recipes to get you started.

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A Fresh Take on Cuisine

A Fresh Take on Cuisine

A Fresh Take on Cuisine: ChefWhen creating memorable experiences for members and guests, a world-class dining program is essential. The opening of the new clubhouse at Quail Ridge Country Club in Boynton Beach, FL, provided the perfect opportunity to reimagine that dining experience, from training staff to providing impeccable service, to managing every aspect of successful food and beverage operations. Leading efforts on the culinary side of service, Executive Chef Reza Adhitiya shines with his fresh take on club cuisine.

Freshness and quality are evident in every dish Chef Reza and his team prepares.

“All menu composition and development are driven by seasonally-sourced foods, emphasizing quality over price, and simply-prepared,” he says. “We’d like our members to savor and taste the quality of the foods without masking them too much with unnecessary ingredients … less is more.”

To capture that freshness and quality in each dish, many of Chef Reza’s dishes celebrate local seafood and other regional ingredients. The menus often feature mahi and swordfish from just off the coast of Boynton Beach and the Jupiter Inlet, grouper from Islamorada, soft shell crab from Jacksonville, and yellowtail snapper from Key Largo – just to name a few.

“Florida is known for its seafood – from the Panhandle to the Keys. We’d like to take advantage of that here at the club. It makes sense for us to support local fisherman and farmers by hiring our own fisherman and farmers tied to our produce supplier and seafood vendor. This ensures simply the freshest seafood available. We insist on sourcing our products from the local Florida market as much as possible,” Chef Reza said.

A Fresh Take on Cuisine: DiningIt’s more than just the ingredients that are fresh. Keeping the menus new and exciting through frequent revision is also imperative. Chef Reza works collaboratively with General Manager/COO Bill Langley, and Director of Operations, Carl Horace, to feature a wide array of cuisine throughout the year that highlights the best of the season. With an ever-changing menu, he also says that setting up recipes which everyone on his team must follow and adhere to, helps to guarantee that the kitchen consistently delivers the utmost quality at every meal.

One of the keys to keeping things fresh, is doing away with the old style of stock-piling inventory in the kitchen, opting instead for the “just in time” method of short-term storage.

“My father used to work at an assembly plant for a car manufacturer,” says Chef Reza. “There, demand drives production. Taking notes from that idea, we only purchase food for what we need, driven by the forecast for two days ahead of time. That way our product is always fresh, there’s less waste and spoilage, and most importantly, we can turn the products on a daily basis which saves money in the long run, and assures the highest quality of our cuisine.”

A Fresh Take on Cuisine: RestaurantChef Reza would like to thank the club members for all of their patience, and feedback this season, which has helped him and his team to continuously improve. He says he is constantly researching new recipes and developing innovative ideas for food, plating, and presentation.

“We have a great team in the back-of-the-house that worked tirelessly this season to get our clubhouse open and kitchen operations rolling, and we look forward to the exciting future of cuisine at the Quail Ridge club.”

From the Chef’s Kitchen

Florida Ceviche

Marinade:

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 cup lime juice
  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • ½ cup olive oil

Fish/Seafood:

  • 10 oz of fish (snapper, grouper, corvina, shrimp, calamari, etc.), cut into half-inch cubes

Vegetables:

  • 1 tbsp tomato, seeded & finely diced
  • 1 tbsp jicama, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp cucumber, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp red onion, finely diced
  • ½ tsp jalapeño, seeded & finely diced
  • ½ tsp cilantro, chopped
  • 1 ½ limes, juiced
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

A Fresh Take on Cuisine: Outdoor SeatingMethod of Preparation

In a non-metallic bowl, combine the marinade and the fish. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
In another bowl, combine the marinated fish and vegetables together. Add salt and black pepper to taste.
Garnish with fresh cilantro and fresh corn. Make it Peruvian style by adding boiled, cubed sweet potato.

Chef Tip

This is a traditional ceviche recipe, with ingredients you can find at your local market. The possibilities for this dish are as wide as your imagination! You can work with vegetables you have in the refrigerator, and be sure to get the freshest fish you can from your local fish monger.

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